Climate Justice

Colonization, Slavery, and Path Dependencies in the Fossil Economy

Identifies a need for direct intervention in historically entrenched forms of inequality.

Inequality, Decoupling, and Sustainable Development

What social changes yield a society that is more equitable, sustainable, resilient, and robust?

Racial Justice is Climate Justice- Racial capitalism and the fossil economy

An exploration of the links between the development of the racial and fossil capitalism.

Are the Goals of Sustainability Interconnected? A Sociological Analysis of the Three E’s of Sustainable Development Using Cross-Lagged Models with Reciprocal Effects

Over time, at the country level, increasing economic inequality reduces renewable energy consumption, with no evidence of reciprocal feedback.

Community water system privatization and the water access crisis

A discussion of the form that debates over privatization of water resources have taken, as well as how the act of privatization has been found to impact access to water systems and the quality of the service they provide.

Renewable energy injustice- The socio-environmental implications of renewable energy consumption

Renewable energy displaces more fossil fuel energy sources when inequality is increasing, while– conversely– fewer existing fossil fuel energy sources are displaced when inequality is decreasing. Efforts aimed at increasing renewable energy consumption should adopt policies that ensure the effective displacement of fossil fuels and reduce inequality.

Time, Power and Environmental Impact- A Growth Curve Model of the Relationship Between Temporal Change and CO2 Emissions Per Capita.

In nations belonging to the core and semi-periphery, temporal advance is associated with increases in CO2 emissions per capita, rather than the decreases that might be expected

Divergent Pathways on the Road to Sustainability- A Multilevel Model of the Effects of Geopolitical Power on the Relationship between Economic Growth and Environmental Quality

Core nations have an attenuated relationship between GDP per capita and emissions per capita at higher levels of economic activity, while those in the semiperiphery have a relationship that approximates the curve of a U. The majority of variation in emissions is correlated with time-invariant variables, not with time-variant predictors, such as GDP.

How do slums change the relationship between urbanization and the carbon intensity of well-being?

While urbanization is associated with increases in CIWB, the relationship between urban development and CIWB is vastly different in developed nations without slums than in under-developed nations with slums.